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November Edition

Researchers and engineers are continually looking for new ways to streamline their products and improve user experience and the basis of these innovations is often developing better hardware. This month, we're seeing how hardware directly affects our day to day lives through the technology we use.

Featured Products

Allied Components International is sensitive to the needs of fast paced R&D labs requiring immediate availability of samples to assist in the design process. So for that reason, we have design kits available and ready to go. Each Engineering Design Kit contains several samples of the popular values within each of the series'.

Together with our franchised distributor America II Electronics, we have created our most popular component design kits for design engineers, components engineers and engineering labs. Please contact Allied Components or America II Electronics for your quick delivery of these in stock design kits.

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Communication is Key

A new set of logic circuits called the Queue Management Device may just be the solution to the overarching problem of communication for multicore processors. Researchers from the University of North Carolina have simplified the process through which these processors work to effectively turn software into hardware.

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Microsoft Surface

Last week, Microsoft launched its first venture into advancing hardware into more than an operating system. Targeted at professional artists and gamers, the new product is an all-in-one device that boasts a 21 inch screen. Will it live up to expectations? Only time will tell.

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Functional Nanoscale Computing Device

Electrical and computer engineers from the University of California, Santa Barbara, are working on creating a nanoscale computing device that is fully functional. By utilizing memristors and a material implication logic system, they hope to enable the device to instantly and locally store information.

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Tiniest Transistor to Date

Using carbon nanotubes and molybdenum disulfide, engineers from the Berkeley Lab have developed what is now the smallest transistor ever. With a working 1-nanometer gate, the tiny device signals further improvement in the performance of mobile phones, laptops, televisions and more.

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